The Men Who Made the Nation: The Architects of the Young Republic 1782-1802

The Men Who Made the Nation: The Architects of the Young Republic 1782-1802

John Dos Passos

Language: English

Pages: 452

ISBN: B000IZBJK2

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


John Dos Passos (1896-1970) was born in Chicago and graduated from Harvard in 1916. His service as an ambulance driver in Europe at the end of World War I led him to write "Three Soldiers" in 1919. A prolific travel writer, biographer, playwright, and novelist, he is an American classic of the twentieth century.

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as they were for a gradual abolition of slavery, dreaded the results of a frontal attack on the slaveholding interests, delegates from the New York and Philadelphia Quakers waited on Congress and on the President with a petition for the immediate end of the slave trade. At the same time the Pennsylvania Abolition Society presented to Congress an eloquent memorial signed by its president Benjamin Franklin demanding the abolition of slavery itself. A new cleavage in Congress was immediately

lodgings that Brackenridge only learned about later: “A treasonable letter of mine addressed to a certain Bradford had fallen into the hands of my adversaries. It was dark and mysterious, and respected certain papers, a duplicate of which I wished him to send me, having mislaid the first copy; that these were so essential, I could not go on with the business without them. This letter was now brought forward. “ ‘What do you make of that?’ said secretary Hamilton to James Ross, who was present:

of spring in 1794, he had been vowing and protesting to his friends that nothing in the world would induce him ever again to accept public office. As he rode over his steep farms, enjoying the sweet air of his heights and the smell of budding woods and plowed lands, noting in his little book the dates of the early bluebirds, of the blackbirds’ first swirling in the sky, of the blooming of his almond trees, he was determined to go on as long as he lived “like an antediluvian patriarch among my

started pestering Jefferson to let him go along on the French naturalist Michaud’s botanizing and exploring expedition into the Western Waters. The dream of his life was to explore the headwaters of the Missouri. As soon as Jefferson was elected President he had Meriwether Lewis detached from Wilkinson’s command on the Mississippi for service in Washington. Immediately the two of them started plotting a reconnaissance of the continent. Singular John Ledyard, whom Jefferson had encouraged while

the Populace to pull by his Legs, and the Man has the Force and Courage to hold while a dozen of them pull him like a Rope, and bring down the Gate, so that he actually sustains the Rack. To represent him drawn out of Joint with his Head turned round, encouraging them to draw still harder, must I think have been a fine Effect. L’Evêque d’Autun agrees with me entirely in this Sentiment.” The night after the fall of the Bastille, Gouverneur ate supper at his club in the Palais Royale with his

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