The Kickstarter Handbook: Real-Life Success Stories of Artists, Inventors, and Entrepreneurs

The Kickstarter Handbook: Real-Life Success Stories of Artists, Inventors, and Entrepreneurs

Don Steinberg

Language: English

Pages: 224

ISBN: 1594746087

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


So you want to produce a short film. Or design a new line of jewelry. Or manufacture a revolutionary solar-powered garden sprinkler. There’s just one catch: You need $100,000 to bankroll your dream, and your checking account has barely enough to cover the rent.
 
Enter Kickstarter.com—the phenomenal “crowdfunding” website launched in 2009 that brings venture capital to the masses. At Kickstarter, it’s not uncommon for entrepreneurs to raise $50,000, $100,000, $250,000, or more. All you need is a great idea—and The Kickstarter Handbook.
 
Business journliast Don Steinberg has interviewed dozens of artists and inventors who launched their passion projects online. Through their voices, you’ll explore all the strategies of a successful Kickstarter campaign. You’ll learn the elements of a compelling Kickstarter video, innovative ways to market your projects, tips for getting donors onboard, and the secrets of irresistible Kickstarter “rewards.” You’ll also discover what to do in a best-case scenario—when your project goes viral and the cash starts flowing in. On Kickstarter, it happens to a few lucky visionaries every week. Here’s how to be one of them. 

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Mob Rules: What the Mafia Can Teach the Legitimate Businessman

Tough Calls: AT&T and the Hard Lessons Learned from the Telecom Wars

Natural Prophets: From Health Foods to Whole Foods—How the Pioneers of the Industry Changed the Way We Eat and Reshaped American Business

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we figured out how much the little percentage that Amazon and Kickstarter take would figure out the cost of the product, and then what we would be left with. We came out with the number that would allow us to be left with a little bit of money after we got all the product and could take a step forward with it.” Romo - The Smartphone Robot type: technology goal: $32,000 raised: $114,796 The Romotive team, which invented a little tanklike robot that can be controlled by a phone, took a

Creative collaborations: a backer appears as a hero in the comic, everyone gets painted into the mural, two backers do the handclaps for track 3 Creative experiences: a visit to the set, a phone call from the author, dinner with the cast, a concert in your backyard Creative mementos: photos sent from location, thanks in the credits, meaningful tokens that tell a story Prohibited Rewards Items not directly produced by the project or its creator (i.e., you can’t offer things you have in

short but appealing description of the reward, and indicate its expected delivery date. Click on Add Another Backer Reward to do just that, continuing to add rewards until you’ve reached your decided-upon number. After you’ve input all of them, hit Save. You can change the information at any time before the campaign is approved by Kickstarter—but then beware: after the project goes live, a pledge amount and its reward description become frozen as soon as one person chooses it. If there’s any

Elixir, the quick-release version, for $30. The chance to try a second time taught the firm’s three principals enough to reach their fund-raising target, but when the time came to send out rewards, they once again found themselves riding on bumpy terrain. They had offered too many variations of the product and were forced to produce some in small, money-losing quantities. All in all, they lost money on their Kickstarter campaign, says Wesley Garrett, one of Swarm’s partners. “Yeah, it turned

when you graduate from high school: they call it commencement because it isn’t an ending; it’s a beginning. Kickstarter has funded thousands of creative projects, and there’s no reason you can’t join that club. If this chapter has been a little scary, cautionary, even discouraging, that’s intentional. You want to be completely ready to roll when that curtain opens and the audience quiets to examine you. If you’re going to ask your friends for their money and time, you need it to be for something

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