Electronics for Dummies (2nd Edition)

Electronics for Dummies (2nd Edition)

Cathleen Shamieh

Language: English

Pages: 395

ISBN: 1119117976

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Electronics is fascinating – want to make something of it? This book shows you how!

You can make all sorts of things, once you understand what electronics is and how it works. This book helps you out with that part, explaining the whole thing in plain English. Learn how electricity functions, how to harness it and put it to work, what tools you need to build circuits, what you can make with them, and how to do it safely.

Mystery solved – understand what makes your iPod, remote control, and computer work
Essential stuff – outfit your electronics lab with all the necessary tools, including some that will surprise you
Schematic road maps – learn to read schematics and understand how they help your project get where it’s going
Symbols of power – recognize all the identifiers for power sources, grounds, and components
Tools of the trade – discover how to use a multimeter, logic probe, oscilloscope, and solderless breadboard
Break it down – get to know the ins and outs of components such as resistors, capacitors ,diodes and transistors
Getting it together – find out how integrated circuits make all the rest possible and learn to work with them
& Analyze it – understand the rules that govern current and voltage and learn how to apply them

Open the book and find:

The difference between electronics and electricity
A list of essential tools
Cool projects you can build quickly
Great places to find parts
Important safety tips
What a sine wave is
Interesting stuff about speakers, buzzers, and DC motors
Ohm’s Law and how to use it

Technical Math Demystified: A Self-Teaching Guide

The Complete Guide to Cabinets & Countertops: How to Customize Your Home with Cabinetry (Black & Decker)

Geometry Demystified: A Self-Teaching Guide

Business Statistics Demystified: A Self Teaching Guide

Audel Refrigeration: Home and Commercial (5th Edition)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

maximum value, while the resistance between the center terminal and the other end terminal varies from the maximum value down to 0 (zero). Not surprisingly, the sum of the two variable resistances always equals the fixed maximum resistance (that is, the resistance between the two end terminals). Figure 5-12: A potentiometer has a wiper that moves along a resistance track. Most often, potentiometers are marked with their maximum value — 10 kΩ, 50 kΩ, 100 kΩ, 1 MΩ, and so forth — and they don’t

Power............................................................ 267 Showing where the power is....................................................... 267 Marking your ground.................................................................... 269 Labeling Circuit Components............................................................... 271 Analog electronic components................................................... 271 Digital logic and IC

or DVD that is not included in the version you purchased, you may download this material at http://booksupport.wiley.com. For more information about Wiley products, visit www.wiley.com. Library of Congress Control Number: 2015944208 ISBN 978‐1‐119‐11797‐1 (pbk); ISBN 978‐1‐119‐11799‐5 (ebk); ISBN 978‐1‐119‐11798‐8 (ebk) Manufactured in the United States of America 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Contents at a Glance Introduction................................................................. 1 Part I:

(up to the maximum current it can safely handle), but the forward voltage drop won’t vary that much. ✓✓ Reverse‐bias (nonconducting): When a reverse voltage (a negative voltage from anode to cathode) is applied across the diode, current is prohibited from flowing. (Actually, a small amount of current, in the μA range, will flow.) If the reverse‐biased voltage exceeds a certain level (usually 50 V or more), the diode breaks down and reverse current starts flowing from cathode to anode. The reverse

switches and relays available (as Chapter  4 describes). Well, transistors have several advantages over other types of switches, and so are used when they’re the best choice. Transistors use very little power, can switch on and off several billion times per second, and can be made microscopically small, so integrated circuits (which I discuss in Chapter 11) use thousands of transistors to switch signals around on a single tiny chip. Mechanical switches and relays have their uses, too, in

Download sample

Download