Down Size: 12 Truths for Turning Pants-Splitting Frustration into Pants-Fitting Success

Down Size: 12 Truths for Turning Pants-Splitting Frustration into Pants-Fitting Success

Language: English

Pages: 288

ISBN: 1594631913

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Ted Spiker may be the coauthor of numerous bestselling diet and health books, but the man just can’t resist a good burrito. Or a bad burrito. (He’s also eaten a 76-ounce steak, asserted that his wife’s post-pregnancy jeans were the best-fitting pants he ever wore, and was asked by his own childhood doctor if his “feminine shape” embarrassed him at the beach.) In Down Size, Ted takes readers on an inspiring, candid, and comical journey, exploring the art and science of weight loss through

his own struggles as a pear-shaped man in a not-so-pear-shaped world, with research about food, exercise, and the psychology of losing weight. He reveals twelve truths about successful weight loss, in areas such as temptation, frustration, nutrition, and inspiration. Some truths:

• Redefine the Definition of Data

• Leave Behind Your Extra Gland

• Think Process, Not Outcome

• Train Shorter, Train Harder
 

Combining science, personal stories, expert interviews, and advice, Down Size is an entertaining, field-tested, and research-based look at how men and women can finally find the body they want.

The Kind Diet: A Simple Guide to Feeling Great, Losing Weight, and Saving the Planet

Secrets from the Eating Lab: The Science of Weight Loss, the Myth of Willpower, and Why You Should Never Diet Again

Mad Cowboy: Plain Truth from the Cattle Rancher Who Won't Eat Meat

Break Through Your Set Point: How to Finally Lose the Weight You Want and Keep It Off

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

thought I was incredibly competitive. His statement stunned me, but Joe—a self-described wiseass who doesn’t give himself enough credit for the first part of the word—crystallized it perfectly: You’re competitive at things you have a shot at winning, but downgrade them as unimportant when you have none. This explains why I feel fiery when it comes to smartphone Scrabble or old-man basketball with my buddies. I can hang in there just enough to make it a game, but when it comes to anything more

way I eat and trying to make adjustments so I can have a better body. I want to have my cake and eat yours, too. While I have had these moments that are beyond the reasonable approach to eating, it’s typically not how I live most of my life. I don’t usually gorge on chips, I try to not order the side of fries (in fact, I rarely order fried foods), and I do always keep a watchful eye over portion sizes (a battle I often lose). This is the dilemma many of us have: Deep down, we know what we should

all your running. You’re still just a fat ass. I don’t run at all and would kick your ass in a race.” Lonnie posted this on his Facebook timeline and challenged his former friend to a race. He never heard from him again. “Haters are motivators,” Lonnie told me. “My trainer asked me how he should approach me when I have a failure, so I can best bounce back. I said, ‘Don’t coddle me. If you want to get me going, get me pissed off. That’s when I’ll respond. Being nice to me makes me comfortable and

wrong by focusing on what she could do: honor every healthy day she had with proper nutrition and what she called joyful movement (a walk, swim, stretch, anything). Her inner voice told her, “Fight for yourself.” Still thirty pounds away from what she thinks her goal weight should be when we connected, Robby would rather focus on her successes than on setbacks. (At her last checkup, her doctor said she was doing better than 95 percent of his patients.) “I realize that I need to be more careful

working as an editor at Men’s Health, and I know that any success I may have in this business is because I had the opportunity to work with such smart and creative people there. They taught me about how to balance solid research with an engaging voice. I also have to thank the great people at Runner’s World for welcoming me into the fold of running voices. I know I’m a nontraditional runner, and while sometimes that makes me feel out of sorts, I appreciate that they’ve allowed me to represent

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